Methyl-mercury in seafood can be harmful for women who are pregnant or might become pregnant, nursing mothers and young children, and knowing the facts about what you’re eating can be the difference between a healthy lifestyle and potentially dangerous effects.

All fish contains minute levels of methyl-mercury, some more than others. With pelagic (open ocean) tropical fish species such as swordfish and tuna that are “top of the food chain” and therefore prone to higher levels of methyl mercury, we do extensive testing to make sure our products are well within safe FDA regulated levels (10/PPM – less mercury than high fructose corn syrup!). So continue to enjoy Orca Bay seafood, a safe, healthy and natural product with a clear conscience and a full stomach.

That being said, the right kinds of seafood are encouraged by the USDA for women who are pregnant or might become pregnant, nursing mothers and young children. Here are statements made in the most recent (6/10) version of the Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010:

“Moderate, consistent evidence shows that health benefits derived from the consumption of a variety of cooked seafood in the US in amounts recommended by the Committee outweigh the risks associated with methyl mercury (MeHg) and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) exposure, even among women who may become or who are pregnant, nursing mothers, and children ages 12 and younger. Overall, consumers can safely eat at least 12 oz. of a variety of cooked seafood per week provided they pay attention to local seafood advisories and limit their intake of large, predatory fish. Women who may become or who are pregnant, nursing mothers, and children ages 12 and younger can safely consume a variety of cooked seafood in amounts recommended by this Committee while following Federal and local advisories.”

And also:

“Moderate evidence shows that consumption of two servings of seafood per week (4 oz per serving), which provide an average of 250 mg per day of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, is associated with reduced cardiac mortality from CHDor sudden death in persons with and without CVD.” “Moderate evidence indicates that increased maternal dietary intake of long chain n-3 PUFA, in particular docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from at least 2 servings of seafood per week, during pregnancy and lactation is associated with increased DHA levels in breast milk and improved infant health outcomes, such as visual acuity and cognitive development.”

 

02/25/15

Best Business Practices

Common Sense Seafood

What is Common Sense Seafood? Simply put, it’s Orca Bay’s dedication to responsible stewardship and wise business practices. It means targeting well-managed fisheries that are built for the long run. It means partnering with quality-minded providers whose ethics are in tune with ours. And it means providing our customers with all the delicious, nutritious fits […]

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