Orca Bay Fish Cake Bites

Combine fish, green onion, parsley, eggs, and bread crumbs in a large bowl; mix well. Scoop out large heaping tablespoons and form into balls. Place on a sheet pan about 1 inch apart. Use a plate or another sheet pan to slightly flatten into cakes. Heat cooking oil in pan on medium-high heat. Pan fry cakes until golden about 2 minutes a side.


Salmon with Shoyu Tarragon Sauce

Courtesy of the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute and photography by Aran Goyoaga.
Directions:

Add all sauce ingredients to blender and puree on high.

Rinse any ice glaze from frozen Alaska Salmon under cold water, pat dry with paper towel.  Heat a heavy nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.  Brush both sides of salmon with oil.  Place salmon in heated skillet skin side up and cook, uncovered, about 3 to 4 minutes, until browned.  Shake pan occasionally to keep fish from sticking.

Turn salmon over and baste with sauce.  Cover pan tightly and reduce heat to medium.  Cook an additional 6 to 8 minutes for frozen salmon or 3 to 4 minutes for fresh/thawed fish, basting occasionally.  Cook just until fish is opaque throughout.

To serve, baste with additional sauce.  Garnish with green onions and sesame seeds.

Shoyu Tarragon Sauce:
2 garlic cloves
1/3 cup fresh tarragon leaves (loosely packed)
1 teaspoon bottled black bean garlic sauce
1/2 cup shoyu or soy sauce
1/2 cup melted unsalted butter
1 Tablespoon rice wine vinegar or white vinegar

Recipe by Alaska Chef Erik Slater: Shoyu is a Japanese soy sauce which is just a tad sweeter than the familiar soy sauce (use soy if you can’t find shoyu).  I use this sauce on grilled salmon, but it works great on any Alaskan fish.  Excellent with roasted vegetables!”


Keta Salmon with Spice Rub

Coat a non-stick pan with olive oil and heat over medium high heat. Season the fillets with rub mixture and place them in the pre-heated pan. Seach each side for 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer fish to an oven-safe dish and place in a 350 degree Fahrenheit oven for an additional 3 to 4 minutes or until salmon just flakes with a fork.

Serve immediately.


Keta Salmon

Keta is one of the best values in wild Alaska salmon and its mild character keeps it approachable to consumers who are a tad shy of full-flavored seafood. All of our fish is harvested in Alaska – some of it gets frozen and then shipped over to China where it’s portioned and packed. Because of this, those bags must list China as the country of origin.