The FDA’s Nutrition label due for a makeover

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Since the Summer of 2015, the word on the Nutrition World streets is a revamp of the Nutritional Labeling and Education Act (NLEA) Panel, commonly referred to “Nutrition Facts” on the labels of food product we consume.

Here are changes you should expect to see, simply put:

It’s the same but not. Though the design will remain pretty close to the current iconic label, the CALORIC VALUE will be boosted in type size. The % Daily Value (DV) will be listed first, in hopes to help consumers visualize the nutrition as part of a total daily diet. In addition to the %DV the actual amount of calories will also be displayed in milligrams or micrograms. Calories will be listed per household measure as shown above “Amount per 2/3 cup” versus the former “Amount per serving”. Servings per container will be listed before serving size.

Size matters and in the last 20 years we’ve been eating more than what most labels are listing as a serving size. Serving sizes on labels will now reflect what is customarily eaten, not the amount we should or shouldn’t be eating. This also applies to foods that are commonly eaten in one sitting (Think: ice cream cone).

Bye bye, Vitamin C and Vitamin A! Welcome, Potassium and Vitamin D! The good news? National Healthy and Nutrition Examination Survey results showed that the US is no longer suffering from Vitamin C or Vitamin A deficiencies the way we once were. Food companies can choose to keep them on NLEA labels but they are no longer mandatory. On the opposite end of that spectrum, there is a Vitamin D and Potassium deficiency across the board and these Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) and percentages will have to be listed. Both Vitamin D and Potassium are both connected to bone, heart, and mental health.

My name is Carbohydrates but my friends call me Carbs. Love them or hate them carbohydrates will be listed by its nickname, “Carbs”. Total Carbs will also have “added sugars” listed directly beneath it. Added sugars are different from natural occurring sugars as they are added during the processing or making of the food product.

Let’s try explaining things a bit better this time around.The % Daily Value footnote has been deemed confusing, and is being reworked to help better paint the bigger picture of % Daily Values. In the meantime, just remember your Recommended Daily Value (RDA) is unique to your age, activity level, overall health and height. Currently, all packages are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, which may not be your RDA – something to keep in mind when crunching numbers and popping open a bag of potato chips.

Eat Responsibly,

Lilani Estacio
Orca Bay Seafoods Inc, Staff Nutritionist

 

FullSizeRenderA life-long dancer and athlete, Lilani Estacio translated her passion for health and fitness to a BS in Nutritional Science from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Lilani has always been passionate about enjoying healthful, delicious meals. As one of five children, Lilani grew up witnessing large meals bringing together her even larger family in the kitchen and beyond. Lilani joined Orca Bay in 2015, after sharpening her marketing skills at the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute and spending over five years collaborating in a test kitchen on fresh recipes at Dole Food Company. When she is not educating consumers and buyers about the benefits of healthful eating, Lilani can also be found advocating an overall healthy lifestyle by teaching Bar Method, representing Zello PRO athletic clothing and accessories, and volunteering as a nutritionist for Solid Grounds and No Kid Hungry/Cooking Matters and is on the Board of Directors of the City of Hope Pacific Northwest Food Industries Circle.

 


St. Paddy’s Day Specials from Chef Bo

It’s almost officially Spring, St. Paddy’s Day is around the corner, and we are midLent season. We have two AMAZING recipes that are festively green but even more delicious than they are festive.

Beer broth clams

St. Paddy’s Clams with Beer Broth

Ingredients

2 lbs. clams, cleaned
3 cloves garlic, shaved
2 medium shallots, sliced
1 bottle lager (can substitute with chicken broth)
4 pieces of cooked bacon, crumbled
Spinach & Parsley puree (recipe below**)

Heat a pan on medium high with 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Add shallots and sweat. Add garlic and cook until golden. Add clams, bacon, and toss well. Add beer or broth and cover. Once clams open turn off the heat and add the spinach puree. Toss well and serve with Parmesan bread sticks.

**Spinach and Parsley Puree

1 bunch, no stems spinach leaves
1 bunch, no stems parsley leaves
1/2 cup oil
1/2 tablespoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
3 tablespoons butter
Blanch and shock spinach and parsley in water then squeeze dry. In blender add oil and turn on high then add spinach and parsley to puree. Add butter and salt and pepper.

St. Paddys Day halibut 2

St. Paddy’s Day Halibut and Pea Puree

Ingredients

1 lb. Orca Bay Halibut loins or steaks
Pea puree (recipe below)
Basil oil (recipe below)
Arugula puree (recipe below)
Mama Lil’s Chili’s in oil, to taste
Pea shoots, garnish

Add oil to saute pan on medium high heat. Add halibut and cook for 1-2 minutes then turnover to sear other side. Add butter and put pan in oven on 400 degrees. Cook for 3 minutes, remove and rest. Plate with a dollop of pea and parsnip puree in the center of the plate. Drizzle plate with arugula puree and basil oil, top halibut with chilis and Pea shoots to garnish.

**Pea and Parsnip Puree
12 oz. baby peas, blanched
8 oz. parsnips, peeled, diced, and boiled
6 oz. stock, vegetable or chicken
1/4 cup cream
salt and pepper, to taste
Put ingredients into blender and blitz as smooth as can be. Pass through a strainer if needed.

**Basil Oil
8 oz basil leaves
1/2 cup oil

Pick stems from leaves, blanch in salted water and shock in cold water, squeeze dry. In blender with 1/2 cup oil on high, add basil leaves and blitz for 30 seconds or until smooth. Be careful not to over work, basil will turn brown from the heat. Allow to rest for an hour then strain oil.

**Arugula Puree
8 oz. arugula
1/4 cup hazelnuts, roasted
1/2 cup oil
Blanch in salted water and shock arugula, squeeze dry. In blender on high with 1/2 cup oil add arugula and blitz until smooth. Add salt and pepper to taste. Finish with a 1/4 cup hazelnuts.


Mardi Gras Seafood Recipes from Chef Bo

Keep the delicious while lowering the fat on these delicious recipes that are not only Mardi Gras inspired but can be made for Fish Fridays, kids, adults on the go, romantic Valentine’s dinner – pretty much created to cook and enjoy at any time for anyone.

Crab and Shrimp Mac n Cheese

Orca Bay Crab & Shrimp Mac ‘n’ Cheese
Serves 4-6
Time: 30 minutes

4 Tablespoons butter
4 Tablespoons flour
4 cups Milk (skim or whole)
1 cup shredded Cheddar chese
4 oz picked Orca Bay King Crab, Dungness Crab, or Snow Crab
12 oz. elbow macaroni

  1. Boil one pot of water. In a separate sauce pan melt butter and whisk in flour at medium-high heat.
  2. Continue to cook flour and butter mixture until it lightly brown then slowly stir milk. Continue to stir as it thickens. Turn off heat and add cheese; let it melt.
  3. Add pasta and a big pinch of salt to pasta. Cook until desired done-ness.
  4. Mix elbow and cheese sauce. Add salt and pepper if desired. Gently fold in crab and shrimp into the mix and leave a few pieces to garnishes the top.
  5. Enjoy and Cheers!

Orca Bay Swai Po Boy
Serves 4-6 sandwiches
Time: 45 minutes (including prep)

1 cup flour (season with a big pinch of creole seasoning)
4 whole eggs, beaten
1 cup cornmeal, medium grind
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, ground
2 quarts vegetable oil
Salt and pepper
2 lbs. Orca Bay Swai Fillets
1 each French baguette
mayonnaise (optional)
hot sauce (optional, but why not?)
Lettuce, pickles, and tomatoes (optional)

  1. Put seasoned flour and beaten eggs in separate round cake pans or plates. Mix cornmeal, flour and cayenne in a third pan. Pour oil in a deep dutch oven or 8 qt. pot and heat to 375 degrees.
  2. Dredge swai fillets through seasoned flour, egg mixture, and cornmeal mixture. Be sure to shake off excess in between each step.
  3. Carefully place 2-3 fillets in heated oil. Cook for about 3 minutes and scoopt our with wire strainer onto a pan lined with paper to absorb oil. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Build your sand which with toasted baguette, mayonnnaise, swai, lettuce, pickles and tomatoes and a few shots of hot sauce if you dare.

King Crab Risotto

Orca Bay King Crab and Mushroom Risotto
Serves 4-6
Time: 25 minutes

1 cup Arborio rice
6 cups chicken broth/stock
1/4 cup cream (optional)
1/4 cup Parmesan grated or shredded
6 oz mushrooms, sliced
4 Tablespoons butter
2 Tablespoons shallots, finely diced
1 Tablespoon salt
1 lb. Orca Bay King Crab legs
Green onion, long cut strips (in ice cold water), to garnish

  1. In a large saute pan melt 2 tablespoons butter on medium high heat and saute shallots until translucent.
  2. Add rice and lightly toast for 5 minutes stirring with a wooden spoon. Add 1 cup stock, pinch of salt and stir. Allow rice to absorb the stock. Continue to add stock in 1 cup increments and stir. Continue until rice is rich, lovely, starch, cream and done.
  3. In a separate pan melt the remaining 2 tablespoons butter on high head and saute mushrooms. Separate a small portion of cooked mushrooms to the side for garnish. Add the remaining mushrooms to the rice with optional cream and Parmesan.
  4. To plate: Start with a round, mound of rice and top with a little cooked mushroom and then large pieces of King Crab. Top with green onion curls.

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Enjoy and Cheers,

Chef Bo

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Bo Maisano grew up in a food-obsessed Sicilian family in the food-centric city of New Orleans. He honed his chops in restaurants in the French Quarter of New Orleans and has practiced in many culinary avenues, from high volume five-star hotel kitchens to mom-and-pop resort town shops. Most recently, Chef Maisano has been the R&D chef for Munchery and product developer for start-up  ventures. Prior to that he was the chef of BoRamen, The Tin Table and 1200 Bistro here in Seattle.

 

 

 


Fan Favorite Seafood Recipes by Chef Bo Maisano

Whether it’s your team is up by 10 points or your favorite movie is nominated for Best Picture – feed yourself and/or some friends these two delicious recipes from our Test Kitchen.

Happy Eating!

Chef Bo

King Crab Bites

Ingredients

10 oz. cooked Orca Bay Seafood Crab (snow, king, dungeness)

1-1/3 cup mayonnaise

1-1/2 tablespoons whole grain mustard

1-1/2 tablespoons capers, minced

1-1/2 tablespoon dill pickles, minced

1 cup diced celery

1/4 cup diced shallots

2-1/2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley

1/2 tablespoons Crystal(R) hot sauce

3/4 teaspoons ground cayenne

1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/4 cup panko bread crumbs

Directions

Mix all ingredients but crab, set aside for sauce. Gently fold in crab meat. Add salt and “heat” (cayenne and hot sauce). Scoop 3 oz (about the size of a large marshmallow) crab mix into panko crumbs and shape into bites. Sear in oil until golden.

Super Salmon Chowder (Bonus: Dairy Free!)

Ingredients

1 lb. of nuts (peanut, cashew or almonds); soak in room temperature water overnight

1 whole large onion, diced

3 stalks celery, diced

2 whole carrots, diced

5 cloves garlic, minced

48 fl. oz. vegetable stock

1 each Bay leaf

1/4 cup cooking oil

1 lb. Orca Bay Salmon (sockeye, pink, keta); 1-inch cubes

Directions

Heat oil in a medium sized soup pan on medium heat. Sweat onion, celery, and carrots for 10 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook. Add stock and bay leaf and bring to a boil. Turn hit down to simmer.

Nut paste– Drain liquid and reserve liquids from nuts. Place nuts in blender container and add about 1 cup of reserved liquid. Begin to blend and slowly add liquid as needed.

Add nut paste to soup pan and whisk. Add salmon and cook for 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Add crackers or hot sauce to your desire.

 


Eat your seafood, it’s good for you!

As a nutritionist and veteran seafood professional I have known all along that seafood was not only delicious but an amazing source of nutrients including Vitamin D, protein, selenium, and Omega-3s. For the past several years as the USDA finessed the updated Dietary Guidelines there were murmurs of seafood getting its long awaited spotlight, earlier this week the guidelines went public and I was excited to see that there was truth in those murmurs. Here’s a quick sum up of what there is to know about upping your seafood intake in accordance to the guidelines that were recently made public earlier this week.

Three different “Eating Patterns” have been created based on the types and proportions of foods typically consumed but in nutrient-dense forms and appropriate amounts:

Healthy U.S. Style Eating Pattern

Healthy Mediterranean-Style Eating Pattern

Healthy Vegetarian Eating Pattern

All three were design to not exceed the calorie requirements (based on age, weight, height & activity level) but to meet daily nutrient recommendations also known as the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA).

In the Healthy US-Style Eating Pattern the amount of seafood based on the “Calorie Level of Pattern” (1,000 calories/day to 2,200 calories/day) ranges from 3 ounces per week to 9 ounces per week. In the Healthy Mediterranean-Style Eating Pattern the range for the amount of seafood in ounces to eat per week is 3 to 16.

In addition to the call out for more seafood as a source of lean protein you will also find seafood dominates the USDA’s list of Food Sources of Vitamin D. You can’t scroll down the list without running into a fish of some sort. The list includes canned sosckeye salmon, trout, swordfish, smoked sturgeon, salmon, mackerel, halibut, herring, rockfish, tilapia, and many others.

During these colder months and fewer days with the greatest (and easiest) source of Vitamin D, Mr. Sun, it is important for us to keep our Vitamin D levels up.

Benefits of Vitamin D

  • Bone healthy: promotes absorption of calcium battling osteoporosis
  • Lowers blood pressure: decreases the production of the hormone renin which plays a role in hypertension
  • Reduces risk of diabetes: stimulates the pancreas to make insulin, regulating immune system
  • Lowers chances heart attacks, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis

Check back with us for more on the new USDA Guidelines and latest studies on the nutritional benefits of Seafood.

Happy New Year and Happy Eating!

Lilani Estacio

Orca Bay Seafoods Inc, Staff Nutritionist

 

A life-long dancer and athlete, Lilani Estacio translated her passion for health and fitness to a BS in Nutritional Science from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Lilani has always been passionate about enjoying healthful, delicious meals. As one of five children, Lilani grew up witnessing large meals bringing together her even larger family in the kitchen and beyond. Lilani joined Orca Bay in 2015, after sharpening her marketing skills at the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute and spending over five years collaborating in a test kitchen on fresh recipes at Dole Food Company. When she is not educating consumers and buyers about the benefits of healthful eating, Lilani can also be found advocating an overall healthy lifestyle by teaching Bar Method, representing Zello PRO athletic clothing and accessories, and volunteering as a nutritionist for Solid Grounds and No Kid Hungry/Cooking Matters and is on the Board of Directors of the City of Hope Pacific Northwest Food Industries Circle.